Education rights and post-it notes

sticky notesThanks to the wonderful invention called sticky or the commercial ‘post-it’ notes, I remembered that today was the start of the Pre-lim exams week for the 1st semester in DLSU-D. So after posting today’s early morning entry, I rushed off to go to school fearing that I might miss a major exam. Bear in mind that earlier, I had no idea of how my exams were scheduled so I was nearly praying to all my ancestors to guide me in this great hour of need.

Along the way, I also remembered that I still haven’t secured my examination permit so with my accelerated walking speed, I rushed to the University registrar to get that piece of oppressive paper that will serve as my ticket to get seats in the examination room. Yes, that piece of paper would prove that I’ve already paid my tuition fees and so I’m cleared to take my major exams. Just like the ‘No ID NO Entry’ sign posted at the campus gates the exam permits pronounce ‘No Permit, No Exam’ this in turn ultimately says, ‘Pay First, Study Later.’ So much for education being a right for every Filipino.

After patiently waiting in line I finally got my permit and immediately proceeded to the bulletin boards on the other side of the Administration building where the schedules of the exams were posted. Pasalamat sa mga ninuo at kay Bathala. Sa Wednesday pa pala ang unang exam ko. In that short sentence followed by a deep sigh of welcomed relief, the adrenaline rush was over and I felt like the weight of the whole world was returned back on Atlas’ shoulders (which were way way much bigger than mine ;))

With my worries over and since I didn’t have any exams for today I decided to go back home and start reviewing (ehem) my lessons until I remembered another important thing; I signed up as a volunteer teacher for the Lasallian Community Development Center’s (LCDC) “Alternative Learning System – Literacy Project.” A program to help the inmates of the BJMP-Dasmariñas (Municipal Jail)-which was just next door from the university campus, with their educational development despite being behind bars. Now this is ‘education as a right; not a privelege.’

Being a student of Biology, I was assigned to teach General Sciences to the inmates and I will teach only one section of 28 students with ages ranging from as young as 17 to as old as 47. Each having their own unique grade level; Lower Elementary, Advanced Elementary and Secondary. Aside from General Sciences, the inmates will also be taught in Mathematics, Social Sciences, and Communication-Filipino which will be handled by the other volunteer teachers like me though not all are students, there are also full-time professors and other faculty from DLSU-D.

teacherMy classes are from 8:00am to 9:30am every Monday and I’m so excited to get started. After posting this entry and bloghopping, I think I’ll skip the review of my lessons and instead, study the modules and teaching materials I have been provided with. It is fairly simple and easy for Biology students like me and the best part is, I’m free to give the lessons my twists, personal touches and approaches. Again, I’m just so excited! Already I’m brimming with ideas on how to present the lessons to my students and all the fun and learnings we’ll have. This experience, if it turns out very good, might even bolster my urge to go into teaching instead of pursuing my studies to become a surgeon.

Decisions…decisions….decisions.

I’ll just keep everyone posted about my experiences and learnings from here on tru this blog but until then, see you at the next post or better yet here’s the link to the history and invention of the nifty post-it notes.

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3 thoughts on “Education rights and post-it notes

  1. I'm not sure if there are programs similar to these that will give them the equivalent of college degrees, but once they finish the ALS classes, they are given exams that if passed, will grant them certifications equivalent to highschool diplomas.

    Glad you asked that, I'll look have a look into it.

    Thanks! 😀

  2. That is quite an admirable thing you're doing, Jhay. Are our local inmates able to pursue college degrees while incarcerated as in America?

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